Powell River Parks, Beaches & Campgrounds

The parks and campgrounds listed are in the Powell River area and extend from Jervis Inlet to north of Powell River City. The majority of the parks and campgrounds listed are Provincial Parks with a website link for more information that includes amenities, restrictions and a location map.  The text in most listings has been taken or paraphrased from the website.

Note: the parks and campgrounds listed on this page can be reached by vehicle or foot.

See Boating & Fishing for marine destinations in the Powell River area.

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Powell River: North South

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Wildlife Watch Pamphlet

Beaches & Community Parks

One of the many attractions of Powell River is the number and variety of parks and beaches.  Here are just a few that are marked on Sports & Recreation Map.

For visual fun browse the photo album on the left.  

Brew Bay • Gibsons Beach • Mowat Bay • Powell Lake  
Myrtle Point • Palm Beach • Willingdon Park

Duck Lake

This large protected area is home to thousands of native bird species. The 9km of excellent hiking trails offer numerous opportunities to view wildlife.

Haywire Bay Regional Park, Powell River  

4.5 miles (7 km) north of Powell River

Tucked into the shoreline of Powell Lake near Inland Lake, Haywire Bay Regional Park is a popular recreation playground on the upper Sunshine Coast.

You'll find picnicking, camping, canoeing and swimming at Haywire Bay Regional Park. One of the treats of visiting this beach is swimming the short distance to nearby Honeymoon Island.

Haywire Bay Regional Campground has 12 waterfront campsites accessed by water and 33 RV/tent campsites. There is no advanced registration other than for group camping accommodations. Other facilities include a boat launch, playground, picnic/day-use area, drinking water, showers, and toilets. (excerpt from Vancouver Island.com website)   More information…..  

Inland Lake Provincial Park

Prior to 1997, this park was a Forest Service Recreation area. The area was established as a provincial park in 1997. Many years ago, the Model Community Society constructed a 13 km wheelchair accessible trail around Inland Lake.

There are drive-in and walk-in campsites available at this park, as well as opportunities for swimming, cycling, fishing, canoeing and boating (10hp).

A 13.5 kilometer, 2 meter wide limestone pathway circles Inland Lake. There are picnic sites, overnight camping sites and fishing wharfs. The trail is totally wheelchair accessible.

Viewing Highlights
There are many viewing opportunities at Inland Lake. If you only have a short time walk the east side of the lake a short distance to the marsh boardwalk. Swallows, songbirds and some waterfowl may be observed. Woodpeckers are commonly seen in the forests.

Khartoum Lake Forest Service Recreation Site

This recreation site offers wilderness camping and fishing and is part of the Powell River Forest Canoe Route. For more information, and to check road access times contact the Ministry of Forests 604 485 0700; 7077 Duncan Street.

Access

From the Sunshine Coast Highway (Highway 101) turn north onto Dixon Road. At the main road division take Third Lake Road. Caution: access to this site is via an active logging road that is usually closed to visitors during weekdays with evening and weekend access only. This can be a very rough road at times and is not recommended for some vehicles. A 4-wheel drive vehicle is best.

Viewing Highlights

The rocky bluffs visible at Khartoum Lake and further north in the Lois River

Valley are good places to look for mountain goats. The best viewing times occur in April, May, October and November.

Lang Creek Estuary

The estuary area where the fresh water of Lang Creek enters the salt water of Malaspina Strait is a very productive area for both fish and wildlife.

Access

This area is located directly across the street from the Lang Creek hatchery site. Walk to the estuary or from the Sunshine Coast Highway

(Highway 101) turn south onto Brew Bay Road and continue straight to the end of the road.

Viewing Highlights

Throughout the year, many different waterfowl and shorebird species use. the

estuary. The fall salmon migration into the creek brings many Bald Eagles that feed on the dead and dying fish carcasses. The November to January period is best to see the eagles.

Lang Creek Hatchery and Spawning Channel

Lang Creek provides important habitat for spawning salmon as well as year-round habitat for juvenile fish. The small spawning channel provides enhanced viewing opportunities.

For more information contact the

Powell River Enhancement Society
604 485 7612
7050 Alberni Street

Access

From the Sunshine Coast Highway (Highway 101) you can turn directly into the hatchery parking area. There are blue and white hatchery directional signs on the highway.

Viewing Highlights

Four species of salmon spawn in Lang Creek between mid August and late November. The most visible species are chum and coho, and they are easily visible in the spawning channel from about mid September to mid November.

Lang Creek Forest Service Recreation Site

This small site is located at Lang Creek Falls. For more information contact the Ministry of Forests 604 485 0700; 7077 Duncan Street.

Access

Access to this site is by trail. The trail head is located on Duck Lake Road 6.7 km from the Sunshine Coast Highway (Highway 101).

Viewing Highlights

Salmon migrating upstream can be viewed. attempting to jump the series of waterfalls. The falls are unpassable for fish. The best viewing time is during September and October. Also chickadees and woodpeckers are common along the trail.  


Lois Lake

One of the larger lakes in the backcountry of Powell River, Lois Lake is mostly known for being the starting point of the Canoe Route (see Boating & Fishing). Flooded to create the nearby dam (prior to 1950), the floor of the lake is a forest of trees (ee the photo album on the right).

The recreation site on the South side has two unofficial forestry campsites and a few picnic tables.  

Getting there (text from Vancouver Island.com):

Follow Highway 101 to the Canoe Main logging road (a rough, steep incline from the highway) just east of the Lois River near Lang Bay (21 km east of Powell River). Follow the signs and Branch 41 to the Lois Lake Recreational site, approximately 7km from the highway. Access to Canoe Main and Lois Lake is not restricted. However, caution should be exercised as there are active logging roads crossing the Canoe Main.

Nanton Lake Forest Service

Recreation Site

This recreation site offers wilderness camping and fishing, and is part of the Powell River Forest Canoe Route. For more information, and to check road

access times, contact the Ministry of Forests 604 4850700; 7077 Duncan Street.

Access

From the Sunshine Coast Highway

(Highway 101) turn north onto Dixon Road. At the main road division take Weldwood Main Road. Caution: Access to this site is via an active logging

road that is usually closed to visitors during weekdays, with evening and weekend access only. This is a very rough road at times and is not recommended for some vehicles. A 4-wheel drive vehicle is best.

Viewing Highlights

A small herd of Roosevelt elk has been transplanted to this general area. By all accounts they are doing well. As you travel in the Nanton Lake area, keep a watch for these animals. They can be observed year*round. The best viewing times are in the early morning and before dusk periods. Look along the forest edges.

Saltery Bay Provincial Park Campground

Established in 1962 to provide ocean access on the Sunshine Coast of Georgia Strait, the park is divided into two separate sites: the campground and the day-use area. The day-use area with its rocky beaches is a popular swimming and picnic site. Lush forests with large, old trees create a quiet setting for the campground at Mermaid Cove. At low tide, the rocky shoreline often has tidal pools with starfish, sea urchins, small fish and crabs. Mounds of seashells called "middens" indicate that this was a traditional gathering area for First Nations.

Scuba divers will find a 3  metre (9 ft.) bronze mermaid at 10 fathoms in front of Mermaid Cove. There is also a change room and shower facilities. A disabled access ramp for scuba divers is best used during high tide. There is also a disabled change room, shower and toilet. (excerpt from Provincial Park website)

Sliammon Hatchery and Spawning Channel

This hatchery is located along Sliammon Creek. For more information contact the Sliammon First Nations at the hatchery office 604 483 4111

Access

The hatchery is located a short drive from Powell River along Sunshine Coast Highway (Highway 101). There is limited parking room on site.

Viewing Highlights

Chum salmon spawn in Sliammon Creek. The best viewing time is during October and November. The actual timing of migration varies slightly depending on the creek’s water level. The small spawning channel provides enhanced opportunities to see the fish. A few Bald Eagles visit this area throughout the year. Also look for pink salmon from mid to late August.

Valentine Mountain

Dubbed by locals as Powell River's best - and closest - viewpoint, Valentine Mountain offers panoramic views of the region at its summit. The half-kilometer walk can be steep, but handrails are available at the worst parts.  Map




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